Barbara W. Tuchman Quotes.

1. "For a knight to ride in a carriage was against the principles of chivalry and he never under any circumstances rode a mare."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

2. "it was manifest that a malady of such horrors, stenches, and agonies, and especially one bringing the dismal despair that settled upon its victims before they died, was not a plague natural to mankind but a chastisement from Heaven."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

3. "THE GENESIS OF THIS BOOK was a desire to find out what were the effects on society of the most lethal disaster of recorded history—that is to say, of the Black Death of 1348–50, which killed an estimated one third of the population living between India and Iceland."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

4. "The cry of Traitor! was not a local voice only, but a bewildered people’s explanation of the inexplicable. It was the eternal cry of conspiracy, of stab in the back."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

6. "the fief of Coucy from the Church; it was now held directly of the King, and its seigneur paid homage only to the King’s person."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

7. "Melancholy, amorous and barbaric, these tales exalted adulterous love as the only true kind, while in the real life of the same society adultery was a crime, not to mention a sin. If found out, it dishonored the lady and shamed the husband, a fellow knight. It was understood that he had the right to kill both unfaithful wife and lover. Nothing fits in this canon. The gay, the elevating, the ennobling pursuit is founded upon sin and invites the dishonor it is supposed to avert. Courtly love was a greater tangle of irreconcilables even than usury. It remained artificial, a literary convention, a fantasy (like modern pornography) more for purposes of"
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

8. "An event of great agony is bearable only in the belief that it will bring about a better world. When it does not, as in the aftermath of another vast calamity in 1914–18, disillusion is deep and moves on to self-doubt and self-disgust. In"
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

9. "Melancholy, amorous and barbaric, these tales exalted adulterous love as the only true kind, while in the real life of the same society adultery was a crime, not to mention a sin. If found out, it dishonored the lady and shamed the husband, a fellow knight. It was understood that he had the right to kill both unfaithful wife and lover. Nothing fits in this canon. The gay, the elevating, the ennobling pursuit is founded upon sin and invites the dishonor it is supposed to avert. Courtly love was a greater tangle of irreconcilables even than usury. It remained artificial, a literary convention, a fantasy (like modern pornography) more for purposes of discussion than for everyday practice."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

10. "in the case of a Gascon seigneur of the 14th century who left 100 livres to those whom I deflowered, if they can be found."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

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