Barbara W. Tuchman Quotes.

11. "What proportion of the peasantry was well off and what poor is judged by what they bequeathed, and since the poorest had nothing to leave, they remain mute. For no other class is that famous goal of the historian, wie es wirklich war (how it really was), so elusive."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

12. "Impunity in such affairs was no longer a matter of course, for the King was Louis IX, a sovereign whose sense of rulership was equal to his piety."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

13. "Owing to the disabilities of the two major sovereigns, one incapacitated by alcohol and the other by insanity, the result was not what it might have been. Renewed madness was already darkening Charles’s mind when he arrived and in the brief intervals when he was lucid, Wenceslas was drunk."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

14. "A reformer exhorted children that they would succeed where he and his colleagues had failed with the charge: "Live for that better day."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

15. "The feelings of the men who had raised Urban over their own heads probably cannot be adequately described. Some thought that the delirium of power had made the Pope furiosus et melaneholicus—in short, mad."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

16. "Money was evil, beauty vain, and both were transitory. Ambition was pride, desire for gain was avarice, desire of the flesh was lust, desire for honor, even for knowledge and beauty, was vainglory. Insofar as these diverted man from seeking the life of the spirit, they were sinful."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

17. "The amount the rich could squander on occasions like these in a period of repeated disasters appears inexplicable, not so much with regard to motive as with regard to means."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

18. "In a long and fiercely argued process, against the strenuous resistance of the peers, he ordered the Sire de Coucy to stand trial. Enguerrand IV was convicted, and although the King intended a death sentence, he was persuaded by the peers to forgo it. Enguerrand was sentenced to pay a fine of 12,000 livres, to be used partly to endow masses in perpetuity for the souls of the men he had hanged, and partly to be sent to Acre to aid in the defense of the Holy Land. Legal history was made and later cited as a factor in the canonization of the King."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

19. "Every incident in the Old Testament was considered to pre-figure in allegory what was to come in the New."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

20. "To admit error and cut losses is rare among individuals, unknown among states. States function only in terms of what those in control perceive as power or personal ambition, and both of these wear blinkers."
- Barbara W. Tuchman, A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century

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