Bruce Schneier Quotes.

11. "Surveillance makes us feel like prey, just as it makes the surveillors act like predators."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

12. "If something is free, you’re not the customer; you’re the product."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

13. "One of the most surreal aspects of the NSA stories based on the Snowden documents is how they made even the most paranoid conspiracy theorists seem like paragons of reason and common sense."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

14. "Following someone covertly, either on foot or by car, costs around $175,000 per month—primarily for the salary of the agents doing the following. But if the police can place a tracker in the suspect’s car, or use a fake cell tower device to fool the suspect’s cell phone into giving up its location information, the cost drops to about $70,000 per month, because it only requires one agent. And if the police can hide a GPS receiver in the suspect’s car, suddenly the price drops to about $150 per month—mostly for the surreptitious installation of the device. Getting location information from the suspect’s cell provider is even cheaper: Sprint charges law enforcement only $30 per month. The difference is between fixed and marginal costs. If a police department performs surveillance on foot, following two people costs twice as much as following one person. But with GPS or cell phone surveillance, the cost is primarily for setting up the system. Once it is in place, the additional marginal cost of following one, ten, or a thousand more people is minimal. Or, once someone spends the money designing and building a telephone eavesdropping system that collects and analyzes all the voice calls in Afghanistan, as the NSA did to help defend US soldiers from improvised explosive devices, it’s cheap and easy to deploy that same technology against the telephone networks of other countries."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

15. "In the 17th century, the French statesman Cardinal Richelieu famously said, Show me six lines written by the most honest man in the world, and I will find enough therein to hang him. Lavrentiy Beria, head of Joseph Stalin’s secret police in the old Soviet Union, declared, Show me the man, and I’ll show you the crime. Both were saying the same thing: if you have enough data about someone, you can find sufficient evidence to find him guilty of something."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

16. "Estimates put the current number of Internet-connected devices at 10 billion."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

17. "By 2010, we as a species were creating more data per day than we did from the beginning of time until 2003. By 2015, 76 exabytes of data will travel across the Internet every year."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

18. "Those of us who fought the crypto wars, as we call them, thought we had won them in the 1990s. What the Snowden documents have shown us is that instead of dropping the notion of getting backdoor government access, the NSA and FBI just kept doing it in secret."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

19. "The most common misconception about privacy is that it’s about having something to hide. If you aren’t doing anything wrong, then you have nothing to hide, the saying goes, with the obvious implication that privacy only aids wrongdoers."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

20. "Lavabit was an e-mail service that offered more security privacy than the large corporate e-mail services most of us use. It was a small company, owned and operated by a programmer named Ladar Levison, and it was popular among the tech-savvy. It had half a million users, Edward Snowden amongst them. Soon after Snowden fled to Hong Kong in 2013, Levison received a National Security Letter demanding that the company turn over the master encryption key that protected all of Lavabit’s users—and then not tell any of its customers that they could be monitored. Levison fought this order in court, and when it became clear that he had lost, he shut down his service rather than deceive and compromise his customers. The moral is clear. If you run a business, and the FBI or the NSA wants to turn it into a mass surveillance tool, it believes that it is entitled to do so, solely on its own authority. The agency can force you to modify your system. It can do it all in secret and then force your business to keep that secret. Once it does that, you no longer control that part of your business. If you’re a large company, you can’t shut it down. You can’t realistically terminate part of your service. In a very real sense, it is not your business anymore. It has become an arm of the vast US surveillance apparatus, and if your interest conflicts with the agency’s, the agency wins. Your business has been commandeered."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

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