Bruce Watson Quotes.

1. "She taught me to be grateful for my life regardless of what that entailed, and that’s directly related to the image of Christ on the cross and the example of sacrifice that he gave us. But the Stephen Colbert who speaks"
- Bruce Watson, Stephen Colbert: Beyond Truthiness

2. "Knock knock! Who’s there? the crowd responded. Unlimited union and corporate campaign contributions. Unlimited union and corporate campaign contributions who? That’s the thing, Colbert said. I don’t think I should have to tell you."
- Bruce Watson, Stephen Colbert: Beyond Truthiness

3. "It has been said that life is a tragedy to those who think and a comedy to those who feel."
- Bruce Watson, Jon Stewart: Beyond the Moments of Zen

4. "Presently we began to have our slices of the national cake, F. Scott Fitzgerald remembered, and our idealism only flared up when the newspapers made melodrama out of such stories as Harding and the Ohio Gang or Sacco and Vanzetti."
- Bruce Watson, Sacco and Vanzetti: The Men

5. "The volunteers merely dropped in for a summer, then went home to question America. Some would spearhead the events that defined the 1960s—the Berkeley Free Speech Movement, the antiwar movement, the women’s movement. Others, spreading ideals absorbed in Mississippi, would be forever skeptical of authority, forever democrats with a small d, and forever touched by this single season of their youth. But first, they had to survive Freedom Summer."
- Bruce Watson, Freedom Summer: The Savage Season of 1964 That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy

6. "nothing trite in SNCC’s founding statement: Through nonviolence, courage displaces fear; love transforms hate. Acceptance dissipates prejudice, hope ends despair. Peace dominates war, faith reconciles doubt."
- Bruce Watson, Freedom Summer: The Savage Season of 1964 That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy

7. "Atrocities, including the lynching of more than five hundred Mississippi Negroes—more than any other state—were ennobled as righteous. Lynching went unpunished, murder was self-defense, and many towns announced their meanness in a road sign—Nigger, Don’t Let the Sun Go Down on You Here. Whites who disapproved learned to keep quiet. Criticism of Jim Crow became disloyalty to be dealt with, Cash noted, by making such criticism so dangerous that none but a madman would risk it."
- Bruce Watson, Freedom Summer: The Savage Season of 1964 That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy

8. "You don’t represent the working men, Haywood charged. I do, the congressman replied in a huff. You are an employer, are you not? Yes. Then you do not represent the working people. You represent the employers. There is nothing in common between the two classes so you - couldn’t possibly represent them both. Despite Haywood’s belligerence, the congressman warmed to the verbal jousting. Laughing at the charge that he had never done an honest day’s work, Ames said he worked longer hours than anyone Haywood knew. This caused Big Bill to snap to attention. Do you think six dollars too little pay for a man to work a week for? Haywood demanded. Don’t you think $7,500 a year too much to pay a man for making laws when only six dollars a week is paid a man for making cloth? Don’t you believe that it is more essential to mankind to make cloth than it is to make laws? The congressman replied that his federal salary was not his chief income and that he gave it, and more, to charity. Haywood said charity would not be needed if workers were given living wages."
- Bruce Watson, Bread and Roses: Mills

9. "With the two sides entrenched, each began a campaign for public sympathy. The focus was wages. How much did Lawrence textile workers really earn? Ettor told the press that the average mill wage was $6 a week; mill owners countered that it was $9.71 The difference depended on who did the math, and how. Ettor was using a mathematical mean, dividing the mills’ $150,000 weekly payroll by twenty-five thousand workers.72 Mill owners relied on what statisticians call the median. Taking a weaver’s average wage of $13 a week and a doffer’s average of $4.50, they found the midpoint, then rounded up. Strikers protested. For every weaver, they pointed out, there were dozens of doffers, sweepers, and bobbin boys earning $4.50 a week or less. Mill owners countered that such low pay was earned only by the least skilled workers, few in number and not prime wage earners. But neither weekly wage figure factored in the several weeks each year that work was slow and thousands were laid off."
- Bruce Watson, Bread and Roses: Mills

10. "A man must always live by his work, and his wages must at least be sufficient to maintain him. They must even upon most occasions be more; otherwise it would be impossible for him to bring up a family, and the race of such workmen could not last beyond the first generation. —Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations1"
- Bruce Watson, Bread and Roses: Mills