G. Pascal Zachary Quotes.

1. "Highly creative people don't necessarily excel in raw brainpower. They are misfits on some level. They tend to question accepted views and to consider contradictory ones."
- Quote by G. Pascal Zachary

2. "Nathan Myrhvold had been a protégé of the celebrated physicist Stephen Hawking before forming a software company in Berkeley, California, with some fellow Princeton University Ph.D’s. What drew Myrhvold, or any physicist, to programming? The outer reaches of science increasingly relied on computers; the days of a genius scribbling formulas on the back of an envelope had almost vanished. Physicists usually saw programming as a means to an end. Myrhvold found that his attachment to software superseded his fascination with physical science. His company gained wide notice when he and his friends wrote a faster, smaller clone of IBM’s TopView graphics program. IBM briefly considered making TopView the software interface—the piece seen by customers—for PCs. Trying to keep pace with IBM, Gates wanted a clone of TopView, so he bought Myrhvold’s company. Since"
- G. Pascal Zachary, Showstopper!: The Breakneck Race to Create Windows NT and the Next Generation at Microsoft

3. "In the early 1960s, IBM attempted to revolutionize the field of software by making it possible to run the same program on any number of computers. IBM proposed a family of machines, covering most of the market and controlled by one operating system. The System/360 line, developed at a cost of five hundred million dollars, was a huge success."
- G. Pascal Zachary, Showstopper!: The Breakneck Race to Create Windows NT and the Next Generation at Microsoft

4. "Compact code was inherently good since it consumed less internal memory. Consisting of slivers of silicon chips called DRAM (dynamic-random-access-memories), internal memory was like a gas tank. The larger the tank, the farther the car would go. The smaller the operating program, the more gas was left for all other programs. Because"
- G. Pascal Zachary, Showstopper!: The Breakneck Race to Create Windows NT and the Next Generation at Microsoft

5. "It wasn’t until five years after the first 360 hardware was introduced in 1964 that all of its software ran well. By then, IBM had spent nearly as much writing the software as designing the hardware. This astonished the company’s managers and vividly highlighted the greatest impediment to advances in computer technology, the problem of managing large software projects. At"
- G. Pascal Zachary, Showstopper!: The Breakneck Race to Create Windows NT and the Next Generation at Microsoft

6. "The Federal Trade Commission, a U.S. regulatory agency, was investigating Microsoft for possible violations of laws aimed at limiting abusive monopolies. This pained Gates, who felt he was simply a victim of his great success. I don’t think the rich get much credit for anything, he said. His own experience, he felt, bore this out. Just a few years earlier, he had been celebrated as the scrappy entrepreneur who courageously carved a thriving business from the technological wilderness ignored by entrenched powers. Now he was a maligned bully who wanted to own the entire software universe; a greedy man who thumbed his nose at both customers and competitors. Which"
- G. Pascal Zachary, Showstopper!: The Breakneck Race to Create Windows NT and the Next Generation at Microsoft

7. "The ability to carry into the future thousands of applications from the past placed NT in a class of its own in the brief history of personal computing. But the Windows personality enabled NT to keep one foot in the past. This was the great departure. Computer makers previously had forced customers to adopt an abandon-ship attitude to their past applications software. To achieve a higher level of performance, customers were asked to leave everything behind (they could still use their old software if they were willing to essentially sacrifice the innovations in their new ship). Microsoft itself had essentially made this pitch when it initially introduced OS/2 in 1987. The failure of OS/2 left a deep impression on Gates; it gave him a better sense of the shock of the new, of just how much innovation the mass of PC owners could accept at once. Customers wanted to carry the past into the future, so NT must support old applications. Achieving"
- G. Pascal Zachary, Showstopper!: The Breakneck Race to Create Windows NT and the Next Generation at Microsoft

8. "The need for reliability greatly influenced the design of the operating system. What was the best way to isolate applications, so that their failure would not bring down NT too? Cutler’s answer was to split the operating system into two major pieces. One piece was the kernel, which never interacted directly with applications and thus couldn’t be contaminated by them. The other piece was the graphical, visible portion of the operating system. To"
- G. Pascal Zachary, Showstopper!: The Breakneck Race to Create Windows NT and the Next Generation at Microsoft

9. "After a time, Fogelin shifted into writing and editing manuals. Often lampooned, these texts, if studied with a fanaticism ordinarily reserved for the Bible, revealed a multitude of secrets."
- G. Pascal Zachary, Showstopper!: The Breakneck Race to Create Windows NT and the Next Generation at Microsoft

10. "In programming terms the piece of the operating system that sustained activity when all else failed was the kernel. It protected itself by imposing certain restrictions on applications, the most important being that only it, and never the applications, directed the hardware. The"
- G. Pascal Zachary, Showstopper!: The Breakneck Race to Create Windows NT and the Next Generation at Microsoft

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