John Ferling Quotes.

1. "Fame had been democratized. During most of history only members of the privileged classes had possessed a realistic opportunity to achieve majestic fame, but in the eighteenth century it has been demonstrated repeatedly, by men such as Franklin, for instance, that fame might be achieved by men born into a lesser social rank."
- John Ferling, Setting the World Ablaze: Washington

2. "As Washington, Adams, and Jefferson reached the cusp of adulthood, each exhibited a passion for independence. Each hungered for emancipation from the entanglements of childhood and sought to carve out an autonomous existence. The handmaiden to each young man's zeal for self-mastery was a propulsive ambition that drove him to yearn for more than his father had attained, for more even than his father had ever hoped to achieve."
- John Ferling, Setting the World Ablaze: Washington

3. "Adams drew back. He wanted Hannah, but he did not live for her. Making a name for himself was more important. He told her that he could not marry for years, until his practice was established. He knew that his honesty would doom the relationship, and Hannah in fact began to see others. Adams's ambition had triumphed over love."
- John Ferling, Setting the World Ablaze: Washington

5. "and a campfire for illumination. Usually a slow writer—he"
- John Ferling, Almost A Miracle: The American Victory in the War of Independence

6. "Washington was unmistakably tenacious and courageous, and an iron-hard ruggedness shined through the patina of genteel cultivation that he had gradually acquired. It set him apart from most other men. He had soldiered for five years, often facing supreme danger. Much was known about his brave exploits. His euphoric remark, uttered during the French and Indian War, about having heard… Bullets whistle and believe me there was something charming in the sound, had gotten into the newspapers and was remembered."
- John Ferling, Almost A Miracle: The American Victory in the War of Independence

7. "Wanting to change only the British position at the top of the American social structure, John Adams feared that a "rage for innovation" would consume what was worthwhile about American culture."
- John Ferling, A Leap in the Dark: The Struggle to Create the American Republic

8. "Jefferson determined the lodestar that lay hidden in the motivations of others"
- John Ferling, A Leap in the Dark: The Struggle to Create the American Republic

9. "The author distinguishes George Washington's leadership from that of another aristocratic general whose temperament was somewhat cold. Unlike him, Washington made the effort to at least appear to suffer with his troops."
- John Ferling, A Leap in the Dark: The Struggle to Create the American Republic

10. "Mr. Adams, by your Name I conclude you are descended from the first Man and Woman. . . . [Perhaps] you could resolve a difficulty which I could never explain. I never could understand how the first couple found the Art of lying together? Adams must have been mortified. He blushed but stammered cleverly, or so he remembered, that the first couple surely flew together . . . like two Objects in electric Experiments. Well, the lady responded, I know not how it was, but this I know, it is a very happy Shock.21"
- John Ferling, John Adams: A Life

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