Lawrence Freedman Quotes.

21. "Don’t you see that the whole aim of newspeak is to narrow the range of thought? —George Orwell,"
- Lawrence Freedman, Strategy: A History

22. "Even where men’s conceptions are sound and reasonable, where by their own creative power and their discernment of actuality they correspond to things, actuality in its capacity as Luck, will behave in an unreasonable way, as Pericles says, and overturn conceptions of the greatest nobility and intelligence."
- Lawrence Freedman, Strategy: A History

23. "What Frederick shared with Napoleon—and what later theorists celebrated in both—was the ability to create strength on the battlefield, even without an overall numerical advantage, and direct it against an enemy’s vulnerabilities."
- Lawrence Freedman, Strategy: A History

24. "As this required a comprehensive defeat, Napoleon had little interest in indirect strategies. When a point of weakness was found, extra forces would be poured in to break through."
- Lawrence Freedman, Strategy: A History

25. "We may be likened to two scorpions in a bottle, each capable of killing the other, but only at the risk of his own life. —J. Robert Oppenheimer"
- Lawrence Freedman, Strategy: A History

26. "Here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast. —The Red Queen in Alice Through the Looking Glass"
- Lawrence Freedman, Strategy: A History

27. "Clausewitz was wary of the general who tried to be too smart. He preferred those who kept their imaginations in check and a firm grip on the harsh realities of battle."
- Lawrence Freedman, Strategy: A History

28. "Ants are among the most warlike of creatures. Their foreign policy has been described as restless aggression, territorial conquest, and genocidal annihilation of neighboring colonies whenever possible. If ants had nuclear weapons, they would probably end the world in a week."
- Lawrence Freedman, Strategy: A History

29. "The forward movement necessary to occupy enemy territory taxed the attacker’s energies and resources, while the defender was able to use this time to prepare to receive the attacker."
- Lawrence Freedman, Strategy: A History

30. "John Stuart Mill in 1848: It is commerce which is rapidly rendering war obsolete, by strengthening and multiplying the personal interests which act in natural opposition to it."
- Lawrence Freedman, Strategy: A History

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