Ross King Quotes.

1. "Every person wishes to know of the proposals, the learned, and the ignorant. The learned understands the work proposed-he understands at least something, partly, or fully-but the ignorant and inexperienced understand nothing, not even when things are explained to them. Their ignorance moves them promptly to anger. They remain in ignorance because they want to show themselves learned, which they are not, and they move the other ignorant crowd to insistence on its own poor waysand to scorn for those who know." (pg. 126) - Filippo Brunelleschi"
- Quote by Ross King

2. "It’s amazing — and poignant — to think that Leonardo (da Vinci)did consider himself as something of a failure. He didn’t believe that he had achieved everything he might have done. His notebooks have a repeated refrain: 'Tell me if I ever did a thing."
- Quote by Ross King

3. "The word nepotism comes, in fact, from nipote, Italian for nephew."
- Ross King, Michelangelo and the Pope's Ceiling

4. "The Black Death was a faithful visitor to Florence. It arrived, on average, once every ten years, always in the summer."
- Ross King, Brunelleschi's Dome: How a Renaissance Genius Reinvented Architecture

5. "At times Leonardo was troubled by his lack of achievement. As a young man he appears to have developed a reputation for melancholia. Leonardo, wrote a friend, why so troubled? A sad refrain runs through his notebooks: Tell me if anything was ever done, he often sighs. Or in another place: Tell me if ever I did a thing."
- Ross King, Leonardo and the Last Supper

6. "That one of history’s greatest brains struggled with amo, amas, amat should be consolation to anyone who has ever tried to learn a second language."
- Ross King, Leonardo and the Last Supper

7. "Let no one read my principles who is not a mathematician, he famously declared (less famous is the fact that the principles he was referring to were his theories of how the aortic pulmonary valve worked). Ironically, he himself was a poor mathematician, often making simple mistakes. In one of his notes he counted up his growing library: 25 small books, 2 larger books, 16 still larger, 6 bound in vellum, 1 book with green chamois cover. This reckoning (with its charmingly haphazard system of classification) adds up to fifty, but Leonardo reached a different sum: Total: 48, he confidently declared."
- Ross King, Leonardo and the Last Supper

8. "In fact, the figure in The Last Supper is not a woman: only the most partisan reading can place Mary Magdalene in the scene. Viewers in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries would have read the painting quite differently."
- Ross King, Leonardo and the Last Supper

10. "Leonardo’s twenty-six-year-old father, Ser Piero, was (as his honorary title implied) a notary: someone who wrote wills, contracts, and other commercial and legal correspondence. The family had produced notaries for at least five generations, but with Leonardo the chain was to snap. He was, as his grandfather’s tax return stated a few years later, non legittimo—born out of wedlock—and as such he (along with criminals and priests) was barred from membership in the Guild of Judges and Notaries. Leonardo’s mother was a sixteen-year-old girl named Caterina, and an apparent difference in their social status meant she and Piero, a bright and ambitious young man, did not marry. Almost"
- Ross King, Leonardo and the Last Supper

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