Scott Anderson Quotes.

1. "British generals often gave away in stupidity what they had gained in ignorance."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

2. "Amid this din of complaint and trivial offense, how to know what really mattered, how to identify the true crisis when it came along?"
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

3. "Initial euphoria would give way to shock, shock to horror, and then, as the killing dragged on with no end in sight, horror to a kind of benumbed despair."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

4. "History is often the tale of small moments—chance encounters or casual decisions or sheer coincidence—that seem of little consequence at the time, but somehow fuse with other small moments to produce something momentous, the proverbial flapping of a butterfly’s wings that triggers a hurricane."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

5. "Better a thousand times the Arab untouched. The foreigners come out here always to teach, whereas they had much better learn."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

6. "Victory carries a moral burden the vanquished never know, and as an architect of momentous events, Lawrence would be uniquely haunted by what he saw and did during the Great Loot."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

7. "Victory carries a moral burden the vanquished never know,"
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

8. "Over the course of his wartime service, Lawrence was awarded a number of medals and ribbons, but with his profound disdain for such things, he either threw them away or never bothered to collect them. He made an exception in the case of the Croix de Guerre; after the war, according to his brother, he found amusement in placing the medal around the neck of a friend’s dog and parading it through the streets of Oxford."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

9. "Arab independence was only guaranteed in those lands that the Arabs freed themselves."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

10. "On top of this was the official indigenous Egyptian government that, though it was quite toothless, various British officials periodically felt the need to pretend to consult in order to maintain the appearance that the wishes of the actual inhabitants of Egypt somehow mattered."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

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