Ted Gioia Quotes.

1. "Dizzy Gillespie recorded it with Charlie Parker in an influential 1945 track (incorporating a much imitated intro—perhaps initially intended as a parody of Rachmaninoff ’s Prelude in C-Sharp Minor"
- Ted Gioia, The Jazz Standards: A Guide to the Repertoire

2. "Jazz at this time is still mostly a group effort."
- Ted Gioia, How to Listen to Jazz

3. "Before taking an analytical approach, you should immerse yourself in the sheer visceral intensity of these performances, which capture the ethos of"
- Ted Gioia, How to Listen to Jazz

4. "inquiries. You will feel it in the music and cherish it as the most magical part of the jazz idiom. If you don’t, you can always leave the jazz club and check out a rock or pop covers band. That’s perfect entertainment for people who want to live in the realm of perfect replication. Jazz, in"
- Ted Gioia, How to Listen to Jazz

5. "The resulting amalgam - an exotic mixture of European, Caribbean, African, and American elements - made Louisiana into perhaps the most seething ethnic melting pot that the nineteenth century world could produce. This cultural gumbo would serve as breeding ground for many of the great hybrid musics of modern times; not just jazz, but also cajun, zydeco, blues, and other new styles flourished as a result of this laissez-faire environment. In this warm, moist atmosphere, sharp delineations between cultures gradually softened and ultimately disappeared."
- Ted Gioia, The History of Jazz

6. "As recently as the twentieth century, some cultures retained religious prohibitions asserting the uncleanliness of believers eating at the same table as musicians."
- Ted Gioia, The History of Jazz

7. "Like the New Orleans tradition that preceded it, and the Swing Era offerings that followed it, Chicago jazz was not just the music of a time and place, but also a timeless style of performance - and for its exponents, very much a way of life - one that continues to reverberate to this day in the works of countless Dixieland and traditional jazz bands around the world. For many listeners, the Chicago style remains nothing less than the quintessential sound of jazz."
- Ted Gioia, The History of Jazz

8. "[T]he piano was to Harlem what brass bands had been to New Orleans. The instrument represented conflicting possibilities -- a pathway for assimilating traditional highbrow culture, a calling card of lowbrow nightlife, a symbol of middle-class prosperity, or, quite simply, a means of making a living."
- Ted Gioia, The History of Jazz

9. "During the so-called Jazz Age, most of the music's key exponents focused their creative energy on soloing not bandleading, on improvisation not orchestration, on an interplay between individual instruments not between sections. [...] Commercial pressures, rather than artistic prerogatives, stand out as the spur that forced many early jazz players (including Armstrong, Beiderbecke, and Hines) to embrace the big band idiom. But even in the new setting, they remained improvisers, first and foremost, not orchestrators or composers."
- Ted Gioia, The History of Jazz