Walter Lord Quotes.

1. "It would be nice to say the rich people, the fancy people, all behaved like bastards and the poor slobs all came through like heroes. But as a matter of fact, sometimes the poor slobs behave like slobs and the great, noble, privileged characters come off very well, indeed."
- Quote by Walter Lord

2. "What troubled people especially was not just the tragedy--or even the needlessness--but the element of fate in it all. If the Titanic had heeded any of the six ice messages on Sunday . . . if ice conditions had been normal . . . if the night had been rough or moonlit . . . if she had seen the berg 15 second sooner--or 15 seconds later . . . if she had hit the ice any other way . . . if her watertight bulkheads had been one deck higher . . . if she had carried enough boats . . . if the Californian had only come. Had any one of these "ifs" turned out right, every life might have been save. But they all went against her--a classic Greek tragedy."
- Quote by Walter Lord

3. "One man who could understand it very well was the architect of these stop-gap measures: General the Viscount Gort, Commander-in-Chief of the British Expeditionary Force. A big burly man of 53, Lord Gort was no strategist—he was happy to follow the French lead on such matters—but he had certain soldierly virtues that came in handy at a time like this. He was a great fighter—had won the Victoria Cross storming the Hindenburg Line in 1918—and he was completely unflappable."
- Walter Lord, The Miracle of Dunkirk

4. "To the British, Dunkirk symbolizes a generosity of spirit, a willingness to sacrifice for the common good. To Americans, it has come to mean Mrs. Miniver, little ships, The Snow Goose, escape by sea. To the French, it suggests bitter defeat; to the Germans, opportunity forever lost."
- Walter Lord, The Miracle of Dunkirk

6. "Overriding everything else, the Titanic also marked the end of a general feeling of confidence."
- Walter Lord, A Night to Remember

7. "The night was a magnificent confirmation of "women and children first," yet somehow the loss rate was higher for Third Class children than First Class men."
- Walter Lord, A Night to Remember

8. "The Titanic woke them up. Never again would they be quite so sure of themselves. In technology especially, the disaster was a terrible blow. Here was the "unsinkable ship" -- perhaps man's greatest engineering achievement -- going down the first time it sailed. But it went beyond that. If this supreme achievement was so terribly fragile, what about everything else? If wealth mean so little on this cold April night, did it mean so much the rest of the year?"
- Walter Lord, A Night to Remember

9. "The clock in the wireless shack said 12:45 A.M. when the Titanic sent the first SOS call in history."
- Walter Lord, A Night to Remember

10. "This was the era when gentlemen formally offered their services to "unprotected ladies" at the start of an Atlantic voyage."
- Walter Lord, A Night to Remember

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