William McDonough Quotes.

1. "Here's where redesign begins in earnest, where we stop trying to be less bad and we start figuring out how to be good."
- William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things

2. "Ultimately a regulation is a signal of design failure...it is what we call a license to harm: a permit issued by a government to an industry so that it may dispense sickness, destruction, and death at an "acceptable" rate."
- William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things

5. "valuable technical nutrients—cars, televisions, carpeting, computers, and refrigerators, for"
- William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things

6. "Dow Chemical has experimented with this concept in Europe, and DuPont is taking up this idea vigorously."
- William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things

7. "Consider this: all the ants on the planet, taken together, have a biomass greater than that of humans. Ants have been incredibly industrious for millions of years. Yet their productiveness nourishes plants, animals, and soil. Human industry has been in full swing for little over a century, yet it has brought about a decline in almost every ecosystem on the planet. Nature doesn’t have a design problem. People do."
- William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things

8. "But ultimately a regulation is a signal of design failure. In fact, it is what we call a license to harm: a permit issued by a government to an industry so that it may dispense sickness, destruction, and death at an acceptable rate."
- William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things

9. "There is some talk in science and popular culture about colonizing other planets, such as Mars or the moon. Part of this is just human nature: we are curious, exploring creatures. The idea of taming a new frontier has a compelling, even romantic, pull, like that of the moon itself. But the idea also provides rationalization for destruction, an expression of our hope that we’ll find a way to save ourselves if we trash our planet. To this speculation, we would respond: If you want the Mars experience, go to Chile and live in a typical copper mine. There are no animals, the landscape is hostile to humans, and it would be a tremendous challenge. Or, for a moonlike effect, go to the nickel mines of Ontario. Seriously,"
- William McDonough, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things