Adventure Quotes.

1. "As he talked or listened, he made grimaces like a monkey.  He said yes by dropping his eyelids and thrusting his chin forward.  He spoke with childish arrogance strangely at variance with the subservient position he occupied beneath the veranda.  He, with his many followers, was lord and master of Balesuna village.  But the white man, without followers, was lord and master of Berande—ay, and on occasion, single-handed, had made himself lord and master of Balesuna village as well.  Seelee did not like to remember that episode.  It had occurred in the course of learning the nature of white men and of learning to abominate them.  He had once been guilty of sheltering three runaways from Berande.  They had given him all they possessed in return for the shelter and for promised aid in getting away to Malaita.  This had given him a glimpse of a profitable future, in which his village would serve as the one depot on the underground railway between Berande and Malaita. Unfortunately, he was ignorant of the ways"
- Jack London, Adventure

2. "I love to think of the success of Berande, he said; but that is secondary.  It is subordinate to the dearest wish, which is that some day you will share Berande with me in a completer way than that of mere business partnership.  It is for you, some day, when you are ready, to be my wife."
- Jack London, Adventure

3. "stand ipecacuanha, and which of them were constitutionally unable to retain that powerful drug.  One who lay dead he ordered to be carried out.  He spoke in the sharp, peremptory manner of a man who would take no nonsense, and the well men who obeyed his orders scowled malignantly.  One muttered deep in his chest as he took the corpse by the feet.  The white man exploded in speech and action.  It cost him a painful effort, but his arm shot out, landing"
- Jack London, Adventure

4. "shot through and through.  Cocked rifles swept the bush with nervous apprehension.  But there was no rustle, no movement; nothing but the humid oppressive silence. Bushmen he no stop, Binu Charley called out, the sound of his voice startling more than one of them.  Allee same damn funny business.  That fella Koogoo no look ’m eye belong him.  He no savvee little bit. Koogoo’s arms had crumpled under him, and he lay quivering where he had fallen.  Even as Binu Charley came to the front the stricken black’s breath passed from him, and with a final convulsive stir he lay still. Right through the heart, Sheldon said, straightening up from the stooping examination.  It must have been a trap of some sort. He noticed Joan’s white, tense face, and the wide eyes with which she stared at the wreck of what had been a man the minute before. I recruited that boy myself, she said in a whisper.  He came down out of the bush at Poonga-Poonga and right on board the Martha and offered himself.  And I was proud.  He was my very first recruit— My word!  Look ’m that fella, Binu Charley interrupted, brushing aside the leafy wall of the run-way and exposing a bow so massive that no one bushman could have bent it. The Binu man traced out the mechanics of the trap, and exposed the hidden fibre in the tangled undergrowth that at contact with Koogoo’s foot had released the taut bow. They were deep in the primeval forest.  A dim twilight prevailed, for no random shaft of sunlight broke through the thick roof of leaves and creepers overhead.  The Tahitians were plainly awed by the silence and gloom and mystery of the place and happening, but they showed themselves doggedly unafraid, and were for pushing on.  The Poonga-Poonga men, on the contrary, were not awed.  They were bushmen themselves, and they were used to this silent warfare, though the devices were different from those employed by them in their own bush.  Most awed of all were Joan and Sheldon, but, being whites, they were"
- Jack London, Adventure

5. "Solomon Island scourges, dysentery, had struck Berande plantation, and he was all alone to cope with it.  Also, he was afflicted himself. By stooping close, still on man-back, he managed to pass through the low doorway.  He took"
- Jack London, Adventure

6. "ancient, grizzled, wild-eyed, emaciated by fever, dragged his weary frame up the veranda steps and collapsed in a steamer-chair.  Whisky and soda kept him going while he made report and turned in his accounts."
- Jack London, Adventure

7. "ketch all alone with a black crew from Malaita.  And Romance lured and beckoned before Joan’s eyes when she learned he was Christian Young, a Norfolk Islander, but a direct descendant of John Young, one of the original Bounty mutineers.  The blended Tahitian and English blood showed in his soft"
- Jack London, Adventure

8. "antiseptic wash.  He dosed himself with chlorodyne, took his own pulse, smoked a thermometer, and lay back on the couch with a suppressed groan.  It was mid-afternoon, and he had completed his third round that day.  He called the house-boy. Take um big fella look along Jessie, he commanded. The boy carried the long telescope out on the veranda, and searched the sea. One fella schooner long way little bit, he announced.  One fella Jessie. The white man gave a little gasp of delight. You make um Jessie, five sticks tobacco along you, he said. There was silence for a time, during which he waited"
- Jack London, Adventure

9. "elsewhere and leave me here alone with a whole plantation and two hundred woolly cannibals on my hands.  Therefore you stay, and I stay.  It is very simple.  Also, it is adventure.  And furthermore, you needn’t worry for yourself.  I am not matrimonially inclined.  I came to the Solomons for a plantation, not a husband. Sheldon flushed, but remained silent. I know what you are thinking, she laughed gaily.  That if I were a man you’d wring my neck for me.  And I deserve it, too.  I’m so sorry.  I ought not to keep on hurting your feelings. I’m afraid I rather invite it, he said, relieved by the signs of the tempest subsiding. I have it, she announced.  Lend me a"
- Jack London, Adventure

10. "He lighted a cigarette, and in the curling smoke of it caught visions of his English mother, and wondered if she would understand how her son could love a woman who cried because she could not be skipper of a schooner in the cannibal isles."
- Jack London, Adventure

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