Chiang Kai Shek: China's Generalissimo and the Nation He Lost Quotes.

1. "You people sit in your yamen [headquarters], and your horizon is your window sill,' he went on. `You are ignorant because no one dares to correct you. You might lose face and, what's more, some one might lose his head. You've retreated into your intellectual rat holes, having exposed only a posterior of vanity. Goddamn it, sir, you've all become insufferably stupid!"
- Jonathan Fenby, Chiang Kai Shek: China's Generalissimo and the Nation He Lost

2. "The Lixingshe movement set up by dedicated supporters from Whampoa in 1932 to ensure authoritarian allegiance to the leader grew to number half a million members, with offshoots such as the political shock troops known as the Blue Shirts. But the notion of a continuous mass movement remained deeply suspect to the militarised bureaucracy in Nanking - a major difference between Chiang's regime and Mussolini's Italy or Hitler's Germany. It presented an authoritarian view of Chinese tradition as a historic justification for dictatorship with a conservative cultural policy to buttress the supremacy' of the state and its chief. Intellectuals were told to sacrifice their individual liberty for the sake of the nation. If the regime had fascist tendencies, it was `Confucian Fascism', as the historian Frederic Wakeman has dubbed it."
- Jonathan Fenby, Chiang Kai Shek: China's Generalissimo and the Nation He Lost

3. "Feeling they were being treated as inferiors by the West, and suffering from American and European racism, the Japanese concluded that they had to make their own place in the world, using force to pursue the manifest destiny of the `imperial way'."
- Jonathan Fenby, Chiang Kai Shek: China's Generalissimo and the Nation He Lost

4. "There were flurries of concern in the West when shells landed on foreign concessions or threatened ships. But, as in Manchuria, nobody would take practical steps to hold back Japan even when its army landed at the end of February and marched in to bolster the lacklustre marines."
- Jonathan Fenby, Chiang Kai Shek: China's Generalissimo and the Nation He Lost

5. "To get round limits placed on the number of dishes that should be ordered, restaurants served several at the same time on large plates, with alcohol brought to the table in teapots.51"
- Jonathan Fenby, Chiang Kai Shek: China's Generalissimo and the Nation He Lost

6. "This is not war but merely an incident." All treaties and structures to outlaw war and to regularise the conduct of war appear to have crumbled, and we have a reversion to the day of savages.' Was Western silence `a sign of the triumph of civilisation', she wondered, or `the death-knell of the supposed moral superiority of the Occident'?18"
- Jonathan Fenby, Chiang Kai Shek: China's Generalissimo and the Nation He Lost

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