Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World Quotes.

2. "Google controls two-thirds of the US search market. Almost three-quarters of all Internet users have Facebook accounts. Amazon controls about 30% of the US book market, and 70% of the e-book market. Comcast owns about 25% of the US broadband market. These companies have enormous power and control over us simply because of their economic position. They all collect and use our data to increase their market dominance and profitability. When eBay first started, it was easy for buyers and sellers to communicate outside of the eBay system because people’s e-mail addresses were largely public. In 2001, eBay started hiding e-mail addresses; in 2011, it banned e-mail addresses and links in listings; and in 2012, it banned them from user-to-user communications. All of these moves served to position eBay as a powerful intermediary by making it harder for buyers and sellers to take a relationship established inside of eBay and move it outside of eBay."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

3. "Surveillance makes us feel like prey, just as it makes the surveillors act like predators."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

4. "If something is free, you’re not the customer; you’re the product."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

5. "One of the most surreal aspects of the NSA stories based on the Snowden documents is how they made even the most paranoid conspiracy theorists seem like paragons of reason and common sense."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

6. "Following someone covertly, either on foot or by car, costs around $175,000 per month—primarily for the salary of the agents doing the following. But if the police can place a tracker in the suspect’s car, or use a fake cell tower device to fool the suspect’s cell phone into giving up its location information, the cost drops to about $70,000 per month, because it only requires one agent. And if the police can hide a GPS receiver in the suspect’s car, suddenly the price drops to about $150 per month—mostly for the surreptitious installation of the device. Getting location information from the suspect’s cell provider is even cheaper: Sprint charges law enforcement only $30 per month. The difference is between fixed and marginal costs. If a police department performs surveillance on foot, following two people costs twice as much as following one person. But with GPS or cell phone surveillance, the cost is primarily for setting up the system. Once it is in place, the additional marginal cost of following one, ten, or a thousand more people is minimal. Or, once someone spends the money designing and building a telephone eavesdropping system that collects and analyzes all the voice calls in Afghanistan, as the NSA did to help defend US soldiers from improvised explosive devices, it’s cheap and easy to deploy that same technology against the telephone networks of other countries."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

7. "In the 17th century, the French statesman Cardinal Richelieu famously said, Show me six lines written by the most honest man in the world, and I will find enough therein to hang him. Lavrentiy Beria, head of Joseph Stalin’s secret police in the old Soviet Union, declared, Show me the man, and I’ll show you the crime. Both were saying the same thing: if you have enough data about someone, you can find sufficient evidence to find him guilty of something."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

8. "Estimates put the current number of Internet-connected devices at 10 billion."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

9. "By 2010, we as a species were creating more data per day than we did from the beginning of time until 2003. By 2015, 76 exabytes of data will travel across the Internet every year."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

10. "Those of us who fought the crypto wars, as we call them, thought we had won them in the 1990s. What the Snowden documents have shown us is that instead of dropping the notion of getting backdoor government access, the NSA and FBI just kept doing it in secret."
- Bruce Schneier, Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World

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