Eleven Rings Quotes.

1. "When we called time-out with twenty-five seconds to go, he re-called, we went into the huddle and Phil said, ‘Michael, I want you to take the last shot,’ and Michael said, ‘You know, Phil, I don’t feel comfortable in these situations. So maybe we ought to go in another direction.’ Then Scottie said, ‘You know, Phil, Michael said in his commercial that he’s been asked to do this twenty-six times and he’s failed. So why don’t we go to Steve."
- Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings

2. "I’ve always been impressed by Kobe’s resilience and ironclad self-confidence. Unlike Shaq, who was often plagued by self-doubt, Kobe never let such thoughts cross his mind. If someone set the bar at ten feet, he’d jump eleven, even if no one had ever done it before. That’s the attitude he brought with him when he arrived at training camp that fall, and it had a powerful impact on his teammates."
- Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings

3. "Every now and then, to keep the players focused, he would ask them to nod their heads if they heard the word defense"..."
- Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings

4. "But theres only so much a player can absorb when his body is pulsing with adrenaline. This is not a good time for deep left brain discussion. It’s the moment to calm the player’s minds and strengthen their spiritual connection with one another before they head into battle."
- Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings

5. "The most we can hope for is to create the best possible conditions for success, then let go of the outcome"
- Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings

6. "There’s a story I love to tell about how Napoléon Bonaparte picked his generals. After one of his great generals died, Napoléon reputedly sent one of his staff officers to search for a replacement. The officer returned several weeks later and described a man he thought would be the perfect candidate because of his knowledge of military tactics and brilliance as a manager. When the officer finished, Napoléon looked at him and said, That’s all very good, but is he lucky?"
- Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings

7. "In The Tao of Leadership, John Heider stresses the importance of interfering as little as possible. Rules reduce freedom and responsibility, he writes. Enforcement of rules is coercive and manipulative, which diminishes spontaneity and absorbs group energy. The more coercive you are, the more resistant the group will become."
- Phil Jackson, Eleven Rings

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