Lawrence in Arabia: War Quotes.

11. "Part of Sykes's motive was rooted in religiosity. A devout Catholic, he regarded a return of the ancient tribe of Israel to the Holy Land as a way to correct a nearly two-thousand-year-old wrong. That view had taken on new passion and urgency with the massacres of the Armenians. To Sykes, in that ongoing atrocity, the Ottoman Empire had proven it could never again be trusted to protect its religious minority populations. At war's end, the Christian and Jewish Holy Land of Palestine would be taken from it, and the failure of the Crusades made right."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

12. "It wasn’t just the British foreign secretary whose time was taken up dealing with such things, but the foreign ministers—and in many cases, the prime ministers and presidents and kings—of all the powers, and often over struggles even less significant than that which entangled Curt Prüfer. Amid this din of complaint and trivial offense, how to know what really mattered, how to identify the true crisis when it came along?"
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

13. "Under orders from Kitchener himself, an attempt was to be made to bribe the Turkish commander of the Kut siege into letting Townshend’s army go in return for one million English pounds’ worth of gold. If Lawrence resented being the bearer of this shameful instruction, almost without precedent in British military history, he never let on. Then again, he’d very recently been given two reminders of the puffery and hypocrisy of military culture."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

14. "By the end of that first day, the advance landing forces at Gallipoli had already suffered nearly four thousand casualties, or considerably more than the total number of men Lawrence had projected would be needed to secure Alexandretta."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

15. "As Lawrence would later write in Seven Pillars, Sykes was the imaginative advocate of unconvincing world movements … a bundle of prejudices, intuitions, half-sciences. His ideas were of the outside, and he lacked patience to test his materials before choosing his style of building. He would take an aspect of the truth, detach it from its circumstances, inflate it, twist and model it."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

16. "Lawrence argued that despite posing as Islamic reformists with all the narrow minded bigotry of the puritan, ibn-Saud and his Wahhabists were hardly representative of Islam. Instead, as he warned in The Politics of Mecca, the Wahhabist sect was composed of marginal medievalists, and if it prevailed, we would have in place of the tolerant, rather comfortable Islam of Mecca and Damascus, the fanaticism of Nejd … intensified and swollen by success."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

17. "had worked so hard to bring about, that Lawrence was suddenly"
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

18. "And for all concerned there was a deepening anger that under the cloak of defending the sacred tenet of free trade, the United States continued to finance and do business with both sides in the conflict, growing ever richer while Europe bled."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

19. "this must surely be one of the most astounding documents ever presented to an Ally when engaged in a life and death struggle. For it imposed what was really a veto on the best opportunity of cutting the common enemy’s life-line and of protecting our own. By acquiescing to such an outrage, Liddell Hart contended, the British General Staff were essentially accessories to the crime, that crime being that the British in Egypt had now been given no alternative but to await another assault on the Suez Canal, and to then launch their own attack against the very strongest point of the Turkish line—the narrow front of southern Palestine—an approach that was to ultimately cost them fifty thousand more casualties."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

20. "When finally Lawrence and the others reached the culvert, they found one Turkish soldier dead and Farraj horribly wounded, shot through the side. With efforts to stanch his bleeding to no avail, Farraj’s companions attempted to lift him onto a camel, even as the young man begged to be left to die. The matter was rather decided when an alarm went up that a Turkish patrol of some fifty soldiers was approaching along the rails. Knowing the hideous end the Turks often perpetrated on enemy captives, Lawrence and his bodyguards had a tacit understanding to finish off any of their number too badly wounded to travel. With Farraj, this coup de grâce task fell to Lawrence. I knelt down beside him, holding my pistol near the ground by his head so that he should not see my purpose, but he must have guessed it, for he opened his eyes and clutched me with his harsh, scaly hand, the tiny hand of these unripe Nejd fellows. I waited a moment, and he said, ‘Daud will be angry with you,’ the old smile coming back so strangely to this gray shrinking face. I replied, ‘salute him from me.’ He returned the formal answer, ‘God will give you peace,’ and at last wearily closed his eyes. After shooting Farraj, Lawrence remounted his camel, and he and his entourage fled as the first Turkish bullets came for them."
- Scott Anderson, Lawrence in Arabia: War

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