Lords of the North Quotes.

1. "I am no Christian. These days it does no good to confess that, for the bishops and abbots have too much influence and it is easier to pretend to a faith than to fight angry ideas. I was raised a Christian, but at ten years old, when I was taken into Ragnar’s family, I discovered the old Saxon gods who were also the gods of the Danes and of the Norsemen, and their worship has always made more sense to me than bowing down to a god who belongs to a country so far away that I have met no one who has ever been there. Thor and Odin walked our hills, slept in our valleys, loved our women and drank from our streams, and that makes them seem like neighbours. The other thing I like about our gods is that they are not obsessed with us. They have their own squabbles and love affairs and seem to ignore us much of the time, but the Christian god has nothing better to do than to make rules for us. He makes rules, more rules, prohibitions and commandments, and he needs hundreds of black-robed priests and monks to make sure we obey those laws. He strikes me as a very grumpy god, that one, even though his priests are forever claiming that he loves us. I have never been so stupid as to think that Thor or Odin or Hoder loved me, though I hope at times they have thought me worthy of them."
- Bernard Cornwell, Lords of the North

2. "Did you become a Christian in your nunnery?' I asked her. 'Of course not.' she said scornfully. 'They didn't mind?' 'I gave them silver.' 'Then they didn't mind.' I said. 'I don't think any Dane is a real Christian.' she told me. 'Not even your brother?' 'We have many gods,' she said, 'and the Christian god is just another one. I'm sure that's what Guthred thinks. What's the Christian god's name? A nun did tell me, but I've forgotten.' 'Jehovah.' There you are, then. Odin, Thor and Jehovah. Does he have a wife?' 'No.' 'Poor Jehovah.' she said."
- Bernard Cornwell, Lords of the North

3. "I hated Alfred. He was a miserable, pious, tight-fisted king who distrusted me because I was no Christian, because I was a northerner, and because I had given him his kingdom back at Ethandun. And as reward he had given me Fifhaden. Bastard."
- Bernard Cornwell, Lords of the North

4. "Tell me how Gisela can be married to a man she's never met?' Aidan glanced across at Guthred as if expecting help from the king, but Guthred was still motionless, so Aidan had to confront me alone. 'I stood beside her in Lord Ælfric's place,' he said, 'so in the eyes of the church she is married.' 'Did you hump her as well?' I demanded, and the priests and monks hissed their disapproval. 'Of course not.' Aidan said, offended. 'If no one's ridden her,' I said, 'then she's not married. A mare isn't broken until she's saddled and ridden. Have you been ridden?' I asked Gisela. 'Not yet.' she said. 'She is married.' Aidan insisted. 'You stood at the altar in my uncle's place,' I said, 'and you call that a marriage?' 'It is.' Beocca said quietly. 'So if I kill you,' I suggested to Aidan, ignoring Beocca, 'she'll be a widow?"
- Bernard Cornwell, Lords of the North

5. "If a man can’t remember the laws, Ragnar said, then he’s got too many of them."
- Bernard Cornwell, Lords of the North

6. "You're a bastard," I said. "Uhtred," he began, but could find nothing more to say. "You're a piece of weasel-shit," I said, "you're an earsling." "I'm a king," he said, trying to regain his dignity. "So you're a royal piece of weasel-shit. An earsling on a throne."
- Bernard Cornwell, Lords of the North

7. "Wyrd bið ful aræd"
- Bernard Cornwell, Lords of the North

8. "I put my hands over Saint Cuthbert's fingers and I could feel the big ruby ring under my own fingers, and I gave the jewel a twitch just to see whether the stone was loose and would come free, but it seemed well fixed in its setting. "I swear to be your man," I said to the corpse, "and to serve you faithfully." I tried to shift the ring again, but the dead fingers were stiff and the ruby did not move."
- Bernard Cornwell, Lords of the North

9. "In madness lies change, in change is opportunity, and in opportunity are riches."
- Bernard Cornwell, Lords of the North

10. "And then I had ridden from the east in the glory of a warrior, which is what I am and always have been. All my life I have followed the path of the sword. Given a choice, and I have been given many choices, I would rather draw a blade than settle an argument with words, for that is what a warrior does, but most men and women are not fighters."
- Bernard Cornwell, Lords of the North

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