Love Letter to the Editor Quotes.

1. "Dear Editor: Do you think there are men in this world who can value a well-educated woman with a mind of her own and the courage to speak it? Is it possible for a man and a woman to have an equal partnership in marriage, seeing each other as God intended them to be? After thirty-five years on this earth, I have begun to doubt it. Sincerely, Wishful in Wyoming Is it true, Father? Roland Everton looked up from the papers on his desk. Is what true? You know good and well what I mean. Have you hired someone else as editor of the paper? Her father removed his glasses and pinched the bridge of his nose. A familiar delaying tactic. Molly’s anger evaporated, leaving behind a desire to weep."
- Robin Lee Hatcher, Love Letter to the Editor

2. "Fair. There was that word again. And her father was right about life not being fair. Especially for a woman. Especially for a woman who valued independence and learning above men and marriage. Not that she had any objection to the institution of marriage itself. There were numerous examples of good marriages right here in her own town. Her parents, for one. But few men seemed to want a wife with the courage to speak her mind openly. At least, no men she’d met. Even her father preferred that she keep most of her opinions to herself. When she turned thirty-five earlier this year, she’d accepted that she was—and would remain—an old maid. Being unmarried wasn’t the worst fate in the world. But she did want to be useful. She would like to feel as if the work she did was valued by others. What would she do when her father sold the newspaper? Something he’d begun to talk about more and more often. Would a new owner employ a woman reporter? Or a female editor? Her father wouldn’t even make her the editor. Why would someone else?"
- Robin Lee Hatcher, Love Letter to the Editor

3. "Fair. There was that word again. And her father was right about life not being fair. Especially for a woman. Especially for a woman who valued independence and learning above men and marriage. Not that she had any objection to the institution of marriage itself. There were numerous examples of good marriages right here in her own town. Her parents, for one. But few men seemed to want a wife with the courage to speak her mind openly. At least, no men she’d met. Even her father preferred that she keep most of her opinions to herself"
- Robin Lee Hatcher, Love Letter to the Editor

4. "True hope is swift, and flies with swallow’s wings, she whispered, quoting Shakespeare. Kings it makes gods, and meaner creatures kings. By George! Wyoming Territory! He was here at last. It couldn’t be hard to find. Killdeer was not exactly a thriving metropolis. I apologize for not meeting the stage, but as you can see, walking is a bit difficult for me. Especially the constant on and off of the boardwalks. Don’t give it a thought. I liked getting a look at the town."
- Robin Lee Hatcher, Love Letter to the Editor

5. "I thought you should have a few days to get your bearings. You can begin work here on Monday. That’s very generous of you, sir, but I am willing to begin at once if I am needed. Roland waved away the comment. Not necessary, Mr. Ludgrove. Monday will be soon enough. Jack nodded. Though my wife is expecting you to be our guest for supper your first night in Killdeer. I wouldn’t want to put her out, Mr. Everton. Jack stood."
- Robin Lee Hatcher, Love Letter to the Editor

6. "At her mother’s words, Molly felt herself go hot and cold and hot again, in quick succession."
- Robin Lee Hatcher, Love Letter to the Editor

7. "One of her nice dresses. What her mother meant was something more fashionable. Molly favored dark skirts and simple white blouses. Clothing that was practical and allowed her to move and breathe. Ruth Everton wanted her daughter in handsome suits with gathered flounces and lots of fringe, and a corset that laced her into the perfect S shape that fashion demanded. Forget breathing altogether."
- Robin Lee Hatcher, Love Letter to the Editor

8. "How she wished she’d asked Father more about this Jack Ludgrove instead of storming out in a huff."
- Robin Lee Hatcher, Love Letter to the Editor

9. "Molly moved to the mirror and gazed at her reflection. Should she be congenial and welcoming at this first meeting? She had no experience with subterfuge and underhanded schemes, but that did seem as if it would be the best way to achieve her desired end. Could she fool Mr. Ludgrove into believing she was glad he had come to Wyoming? I must, she whispered. There’s no other way. She would put on this fancy gown, sweep up her hair on her head, and act the perfect and proper lady for the evening, all the while looking for where this man from Iowa might be most vulnerable, most easily driven back to whence he came."
- Robin Lee Hatcher, Love Letter to the Editor

Browse By Letters