Northanger Abbey Quotes.

1. "Father, everybody has mugs these days. It's not a sign of debauchery and disrepute to drink tea from a mug."
- Val McDermid, Northanger Abbey

2. "It was a source of constant disappointment to Catherine Morland that her life did not more closely resemble her books. Or rather, that the books in which she found its likeness were so unexciting."
- Val McDermid, Northanger Abbey

3. "You can't prove a negative. I can't prove there are no such thing as vampires any more than you can prove you're not a lesbian."
- Val McDermid, Northanger Abbey

4. "Admittedly, they [(places in novels)] didn't all have such ridiculous names as the ones in the Piddle Valley where her father's group of parishes was centered. It would have been hard to make credible a romantic fiction set in Farleigh Piddle, Middle Piddle, Nether Piddle and Piddle Dummer."
- Val McDermid, Northanger Abbey

5. "It’s your fault because you got me into Morag Fraser. I’d never even heard of the Hebridean Harpies series till you dragged me along to her event. And now I am totally hooked. I was reading Vampires on Vatersay till one in the morning. I just had to finish it. And then I started Banshees of Berneray at breakfast and I could hardly drag myself away from it to come and meet you."
- Val McDermid, Northanger Abbey

6. "junction at the top of the stairs. She gave a curious glance down General Tilney’s corridor, but she"
- Val McDermid, Northanger Abbey

7. "The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid."
- Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey

8. "There is nothing I would not do for those who are really my friends. I have no notion of loving people by halves, it is not my nature."
- Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey

9. "It is only a novel... or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties, the liveliest effusions of wit and humour, are conveyed to the world in the best-chosen language"
- Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey

10. "It would be mortifying to the feelings of many ladies, could they be made to understand how little the heart of a man is affected by what is costly or new in their attire... Woman is fine for her own satisfaction alone. No man will admire her the more, no woman will like her the better for it. Neatness and fashion are enough for the former, and a something of shabbiness or impropriety will be most endearing to the latter."
- Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey

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