Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence Quotes.

1. "If you knew how the journey was going to end, you could afford to be patient along the path."
- Joseph J. Ellis, Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence

2. "Washington not only fit the bill physically, he was also almost perfect psychologically, so comfortable with his superiority that he felt no need to explain himself. (As a young man during the French and Indian war he had been more outspoken, but he learned from experience to allow his sheer presence to speak for itself.) While less confident men blathered on, he remained silent, thereby making himself a vessel into which admirers for their fondest convictions, becoming a kind of receptacle for diverse aspirations that magically came together in one man."
- Joseph J. Ellis, Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence

3. "I have often thought how much happier I should have been if, instead of accepting a command under such Circumstances, I should have taken my musket upon my Shoulder & entered the Ranks or … had retir’d to the back country & lived in a Wig-wam. —GEORGE WASHINGTON"
- Joseph J. Ellis, Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence

4. "eager to oppose Thomas Paine’s prescription in Common Sense for a huge single-house legislature that purportedly embodied the will of the people in its purest form. For Adams, the people was a more complicated, multivoiced, hydra-headed thing that had to be enclosed within different chambers."
- Joseph J. Ellis, Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence

5. "In the summer of 1776, the average British soldier was 28 years old with seven years experience in the Army. The average American soldier was 20 and had known military life for only six months."
- Joseph J. Ellis, Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence

6. "They were trying to orchestrate a revolution, which almost by definition generated a sense of collective trauma that defied any semblance of coherence and control. If we wish to rediscover the psychological context of the major players in Philadelphia, we need to abandon our hindsight omniscience and capture their mentality as they negotiated the unknown."
- Joseph J. Ellis, Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence

7. "the land of opportunity, where credentials mattered less than demonstrated ability."
- Joseph J. Ellis, Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence

8. "Unquestionably, New York enjoyed enormous strategic significance. As Adams had already apprised Washington, it was the nexus of the Northern and Southern colonies … the key to the whole Continent, as it is a Passage to Canada, to the Great Lakes, and to all the Indian Nations."
- Joseph J. Ellis, Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence

9. "Namely, the very values that the American patriots claimed to be fighting for were incompatible with the disciplined culture required in a professional army. Republics were committed to a core principle of consent, while armies were the institutional embodiments of unthinking obedience and routinized coercion. The very idea of a standing army struck most members of the Continental Congress and the state legislatures as a highly dangerous threat to republican principles."
- Joseph J. Ellis, Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence

10. "But the question made no sense to the bulk of the troops, who regarded instinctive obedience to orders and ready acceptance of subordination within a military hierarchy as infringements on the very liberty they were fighting for. They saw themselves as invincible, not because they were disciplined soldiers like the redcoats but because they were patriotic, liberty-loving men willing to risk their lives for their convictions."
- Joseph J. Ellis, Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence

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