The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives Quotes.

1. "All we needed when we first came to Jesus was his grace, and grace is all we need to grow in Christ. Grace liberates us. Our tendency toward performance imprisons us."
- Lee Strobel, The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives

2. "These are his people, this congregation of misfits, crack addicts, and drunks, the unshaven, unwashed, unemployed, and unwanted."
- Lee Strobel, The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives

3. "One night I got a call from the church’s senior pastor, Bill Hybels. I heard a nasty rumor about you, he said. I was taken aback. Like what? That you’re working at the church sixty or seventy hours a week. That you’re there late into the night and all day Sunday. To be honest, I swelled with pride. That’s right, I wanted to say. I’m the hardest working member of the staff. Finally, it’s time for some recognition and thanks — if not directly from God, then from my pastor."
- Lee Strobel, The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives

4. "Yes, in Christianity, the gap that our sin creates between us and God is simply insurmountable. Trying to cross it is like jumping off the Newport Beach pier and trying to leap to Hawaii, he said, gesturing in the general direction of the Pacific Ocean."
- Lee Strobel, The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives

5. "The insights that freed Jud were similar to the ones that led to my own recovery from spiritual workaholism after being confronted by my boss years ago. I came to realize that God didn’t love me because I made myself valuable through service; on the contrary, I was valuable because I was loved by God. I could stop working like a slave to justify myself; I just needed to recognize — and celebrate — my adoption as God’s child."
- Lee Strobel, The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives

6. "But C. S. Lewis made the point that we hate sin but love the sinner all the time — in our own lives. In other words, when we’re judging ourselves, we always love the sinner despite our sin. We accept ourselves, even though we might not always like our behavior."
- Lee Strobel, The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives

7. "It’s hard to think seriously about grace until you understand that you’ve failed morally and will someday stand accountable before a holy God."
- Lee Strobel, The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives

8. "says he ‘welcomes sinners and eats with them.’14 Now, think about that. In his culture, to dine with someone meant to offer friendship. The word welcome in Greek means that he took great pleasure in them. Jesus doesn’t delight in sin, but he liked being around these people, maybe because they were well aware of their depravity, unlike many of the religious folks who masked it with hypocrisy."
- Lee Strobel, The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives

9. "Are you sure? I asked. I thought there was a story in Buddhist literature that parallels the Prodigal Son parable. Well, they’re similar to the degree that they both involve sons who rebelled and left home, then later saw the error of their ways and came back. But the Buddhist story ends quite differently — the son has to work off his misdeeds. How? He ends up toiling for twenty-five years, hauling dung. So that provides a stark contrast between the God of grace and a religion where people have to work their way to nirvana."
- Lee Strobel, The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives

10. "Over the next 1,364 days, the Khmer Rouge, seeking to obliterate the social classes and create an agrarian society of peasants, was responsible for killing, starving, or working to death about two million Cambodians, out of a population of eight million. Accounting for the percentage of people destroyed, Pol Pot’s Communist regime was the most murderous in the modern age."
- Lee Strobel, The Case for Grace: A Journalist Explores the Evidence of Transformed Lives

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