The Gnostic Jung: Including <Seven Sermons to the Dead> Quotes.

1. "Moderns consider themselves wholly rational, unemotional, scientific, and atheistic. Where earlier humanity had realized its unconscious through religion, moderns dismiss both religion and the unconscious as prescientific delusions. Instead, moderns proudly identify themselves with their ego and thereby boast of their omnipotence: nowadays most people identify themselves almost exclusively with their consciousness, and imagine that they"
- C.G. Jung, The Gnostic Jung: Including

2. "and doctrinairism are the disease of our time; they pretend to have all the answers.44 Where primitives identify themselves with the world itself, moderns identify themselves with the part of them that controls the world: the ego."
- C.G. Jung, The Gnostic Jung: Including

3. "Like Gnostics, contemporaries feel alienated from their roots and are seeking to overcome the alienation. They are seeking new outlets for their unconscious. Where Gnostics feel cut off from the outer world, contemporaries feel cut off from the inner one. Contemporaries do not, like Gnostics, project their alienation onto the cosmos; through Jungian psychology they seek to discover their true selves within rather than outside themselves. They alone, then, have the chance fully to overcome their alienation."
- C.G. Jung, The Gnostic Jung: Including

4. "Only Gnostics and contemporaries qualify, for they alone are both severed from their unconscious and aware of the fact."
- C.G. Jung, The Gnostic Jung: Including

5. "primordial. It is the source or agent of everything else. Prior to its emanating anything, it is whole, self-sufficient, perfect. The godhead thus symbolizes the unconscious before the emergence of the ego out of it.58 As a"
- C.G. Jung, The Gnostic Jung: Including

6. "As a symbol of the all-encompassing unconscious, the godhead is appropriately androgynous rather than exclusively male or female.59 For Jungians, the initially androgynous godhead ordinarily becomes a female god, whose bearing of a son symbolizes the emergence of the ego out of the primordial unconscious.60 The emergence of matter alongside the immaterial godhead symbolizes the beginning, but just the beginning, of the emergence of the ego out of the unconscious. Inert matter itself does not symbolize the ego, which"
- C.G. Jung, The Gnostic Jung: Including

7. "In short, Jung’s insights need to be considered as one of the latest and greatest manifestations of the stream of alternative spirituality which descends from the Gnostics.130"
- C.G. Jung, The Gnostic Jung: Including

8. "If ignorance alone, according to Gnostic orthodoxy, keeps humans tied to the material world, knowledge frees them from it. Because humans are ignorant, that knowledge must come from outside them. Because the powers of the material world are ignorant, too, that knowledge must come from beyond them as well: it can come only from the godhead. The dependence of humanity on the godhead matches the dependence of the ego on the unconscious to reveal itself."
- C.G. Jung, The Gnostic Jung: Including

9. "Jung identifies the Anthropos (Primal Man or Original Man), Christ, and the Son with God. The Anthropos begins as part of the unconscious godhead, emerges as an independent ego, eventually forgets his unconscious origin, must be reminded of it by the godhead, and then returns to it to form a unified"
- C.G. Jung, The Gnostic Jung: Including

10. "unified self. Misleadingly identifying the Demiurge with the Anthropos, Jung says: The primordial image of the quaternity coalesces, for the Gnostics, with the figure of the demiurge or Anthropos. He is, as it were, the victim of his own creative act, for, when he descended into Physis, he was caught in her embrace. The image of the anima mundi or Original Man latent in the dark of matter expresses the presence of a transconscious centre which, because of its quaternary character and its roundness, must be regarded as a symbol of wholeness.76"
- C.G. Jung, The Gnostic Jung: Including

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