The Peabody Sisters Quotes.

11. "her smile was always to me like the shining out of an angel’s face from behind a mask where brave struggles with heavy sorrows had left deep imprints of mortality."
- Megan Marshall, The Peabody Sisters

12. "pain clinging to me—like a good friend,"
- Megan Marshall, The Peabody Sisters

13. "the importance of words as the signs of our thoughts and feelings in all their minutest shades and variations."
- Megan Marshall, The Peabody Sisters

14. "Illness controlled her without making her feel that her liberty was invaded,"
- Megan Marshall, The Peabody Sisters

15. "Although he had no dramatic successes to report as yet, Howe knew that he could win supporters by showing them a few blind children working together in a schoolroom to master the rudiments of spelling, mathematics, and even geography from specially crafted globes—unthinkable anywhere in the United States until now."
- Megan Marshall, The Peabody Sisters

16. "she suffered from an impetuosity of feeling. The effort to say everything in a breath caused her only to begin at the end, or dash into the middle of her argument when she felt the pressure to defend herself. The same pressure gives my voice a tone, which those around me mistake for anger with them; and thus I leave the impression of having a confused head & a bad temper."
- Megan Marshall, The Peabody Sisters

17. "she experienced through music the highest moments of a contemplative kind, when I seemed to see the relations of things . . . and my soul was rapt to enthusiasm to live & be what I ought."
- Megan Marshall, The Peabody Sisters

18. "Elizabeth might revere Waldo Emerson as an oracle of truth, but Waldo held Elizabeth in high esteem too. Her 1830 translation of de Gérando’s Self-Education inspired him, and her manuscript translation of the French mystic Guillaume Oegger’s True Messiah had provided good things as well. At this formative time in his life, Waldo Emerson found in Elizabeth Peabody both a woman who knew the ins and outs of the publishing world—she would advise him on dealings with their mutual publisher, James Munroe—and a raconteur with the authority of a learned professor or high literary celebrity in her talk. For the most part, as Elizabeth had intuited, Waldo was able to disregard the less compelling aspects of her personality that, to a man whose feminine ideal was still the nineteen-year-old invalid bride he had lost to tuberculosis, were inclined to offend, and accept her as a fellow being of infinite capacity. In"
- Megan Marshall, The Peabody Sisters

19. "The American Scholar, as Emerson titled the speech for a press run of five hundred copies that swiftly sold out, pointedly omitted any acknowledgment of Harvard’s role in educating the rising generation. Rather it was an impassioned appeal to the individual man—any man—to plant himself indomitably on his instincts, and there abide. The speech was a hymn to self-education, to the scholar as a man of action, and an implicit denunciation of life within the academy. Oliver Wendell Holmes would later call it our intellectual Declaration of Independence. I"
- Megan Marshall, The Peabody Sisters

20. "Waldo Emerson may have been a prize catch—mine own angel-man, Lidian called him in an early letter to her sister. Yet becoming the wife of the free-lance philosopher also required the giving up of an existence she thoroughly enjoyed, as one of the Emerson children later wrote, describing their mother’s transformation from self-sufficient intellectual to genius domi."
- Megan Marshall, The Peabody Sisters

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