The Portrait of a Lady Quotes.

1. "It has made me better loving you... it has made me wiser, and easier, and brighter. I used to want a great many things before, and to be angry that I did not have them. Theoretically, I was satisfied. I flattered myself that I had limited my wants. But I was subject to irritation; I used to have morbid sterile hateful fits of hunger, of desire. Now I really am satisfied, because I can’t think of anything better. It’s just as when one has been trying to spell out a book in the twilight, and suddenly the lamp comes in. I had been putting out my eyes over the book of life, and finding nothing to reward me for my pains; but now that I can read it properly I see that it’s a delightful story."
- Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady

2. "There are few hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea."
- Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady

3. "I'm yours for ever--for ever and ever. Here I stand; I'm as firm as a rock. If you'll only trust me, how little you'll be disappointed. Be mine as I am yours."
- Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady

4. "Her reputation for reading a great deal hung about her like the cloudy envelope of a goddess in an epic."
- Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady

5. "I always want to know the things one shouldn't do." "So as to do them?" asked her aunt. "So as to choose." said Isabel"
- Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady

6. "I call people rich when they're able to meet the requirements of their imagination."
- Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady

7. "She had an immense curiosity about life, and was constantly staring and wondering."
- Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady

8. "And remember this, that if you've been hated, you've also been loved."
- Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady

9. "She is written in a foreign tongue."
- Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady

10. "She was a young person of many theories; her imagination was remarkably active. It had been her fortune to possess a finer mind than most of the persons among whom her lot was cast; to have a larger perception of surrounding facts, and to care for knowledge that was tinged with the unfamiliar...It may be affirmed without delay that She was probably very liable to the sin of self-esteem; she often surveyed with complacency the field of her own nature; she was in the habit of taking for granted, on scanty evidence, that she was right; impulsively, she often admired herself...Every now and then she found out she was wrong, and then she treated herself to a week of passionate humility. After this she held her head higher than ever again; for it was of no use, she had an unquenchable desire to think well of herself. She had a theory that it was only on this condition that life was worth living; that one should be one of the best, should be conscious of a fine organization, should move in the realm of light, of natural wisdom, of happy impulse, of inspiration gracefully chronic."
- Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady

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