The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt Quotes.

1. "In the tired hand of a dying man, Theodore Senior had written: "The 'Machine politicians' have shown their colors... I feel sorry for the country however as it shows the power of partisan politicians who think of nothing higher than their own interests, and I feel for your future. We cannot stand so corrupt a government for any great length of time."
- Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

2. "[Bram Stoker] wrote in his diary: "Must be President some day. A man you can't cajole, can't frighten, can't buy."
- Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

3. "[Speaker Reed's] wit was brilliant and usually cruel... Asked to attend the funeral of a political enemy, he refused, "but that does not mean to say I do not heartily approve of it."
- Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

4. "Let’s ask him, Lincoln Steffens suggested. The two men dashed across to headquarters and burst into Roosevelt’s office. Riis put the question directly. Was he working to be President? The effect, wrote Steffens, was frightening. TR leaped to his feet, ran around his desk, and fists clenched, teeth bared, he seemed about to throttle Riis, who cowered away, amazed. Don’t you dare ask me that, TR yelled at Riis. Don’t you put such ideas into my head. No friend of mine would ever say a thing like that, you—you— Riis’s shocked face or TR’s recollection that he had few friends as devoted as Jake Riis halted him. He backed away, came up again to Riis, and put his arm over his shoulder. Then he beckoned me close and in an awed tone of voice explained. Never, never, you must never either of you remind a man at work on a political job that he may be President. It almost always kills him politically. He loses his nerve; he can’t do his work; he gives up the very traits that are making him a possibility. I, for instance, I am going to do great things here, hard things that require all the courage, ability, work that I am capable of … But if I get to thinking of what it might lead to— He stopped, held us off, and looked into our faces with his face screwed up into a knot, as with lowered voice he said slowly: I must be wanting to be President. Every young man does. But I won’t let myself think of it; I must not, because if I do, I will begin to work for it, I’ll be careful, calculating, cautious in word and act, and so—I’ll beat myself. See? Again he looked at us as if we were enemies; then he threw us away from him and went back to his desk. Go on away, now, he said, and don’t you ever mention the—don’t you ever mention that to me again.141"
- Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

5. "For once, he could look back at the past without regret, and at the future without bewilderment. Simply and touchingly, he wrote in his diary: I have had so much happiness in my life so far that I feel, no matter what sorrows come, the joys will have overbalanced them."
- Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

6. "Theodore," [Theodore Sr] said, eschewing boyish nicknames, "you have the mind but you have not the body, and without the help of the body the mind cannot go as far as it should. You must make your body. It is hard drudgery to make one's body, but I know you will do it."
- Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

7. "It is not often that a man can make opportunities for himself. But he can put himself in such shape that when or if the opportunities come he is ready to take advantage of them."
- Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

8. "… I would rather go out of politics having the feeling that I had done what was right than stay in with the approval of all men, knowing in my heart that I have acted as I ought not to."
- Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

9. "We Americans have many grave problems to solve, many threatening evils to fight, and many deeds to do, if, as we hope and believe, we have the wisdom, the strength, and the courage and the virtue to do them. But we must face facts as they are. We must neither surrender ourselves to a foolish optimism, nor succumb to a timid and ignoble pessimism … "
- Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

10. "Wall Street billionaires are predicting that Roosevelt-style railroad rate regulation will sooner or later bring about financial catastrophe. [ca. 1906]"
- Edmund Morris, The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt

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