The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains Quotes.

1. "The Net’s interactivity gives us powerful new tools for finding information, expressing ourselves, and conversing with others. It also turns us into lab rats constantly pressing levers to get tiny pellets of social or intellectual nourishment."
- Nicholas Carr, The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains

2. "We become, neurologically, what we think."(33)"
- Nicholas Carr, The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains

3. "What the Net seems to be doing is chipping away my capacity for concentration and contemplation. Whether I’m online or not, my mind now expects to take in information the way the Net distributes it: in a swiftly moving stream of particles. Once I was a scuba diver in the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski."
- Nicholas Carr, The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains

4. "In the quiet spaces opened up by the prolonged, undistracted reading of a book, people made their own associations, drew their own inferences and analogies, fostered their own ideas. They thought deeply as they read deeply."
- Nicholas Carr, The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains

5. "Culture is sustained in our synapses...It's more than what can be reduced to binary code and uploaded onto the Net. To remain vital, culture must be renewed in the minds of the members of every generation. Outsource memory, and culture withers."
- Nicholas Carr, The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains

6. "[Patricia Greenfield] concluded that every medium develops some cognitive skills at the expense of others. Our growing use of the Net and other screen-based technologies has led to the widespread and sophisticated development of visual-spatial skills. We can, for example, rotate objects in our minds better than we used to be able to. But our new strengths in visual-spatial intelligence go hand in hand with a weakening of our capacities for the kind of deep processing that underpins mindful knowledge acquisition, inductive analysis, critical thinking, imagination, and reflection."
- Nicholas Carr, The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains

7. "We don’t constrain our mental powers when we store new long-term memories. We strengthen them. With each expansion of our memory comes an enlargement of our intelligence. The Web provides a convenient and compelling supplement to personal memory - but when we start using the Web as a substitute for personal memory, by bypassing the inner processes of consolidation, we risk emptying our minds of their riches."
- Nicholas Carr, The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains

8. "We want to be interrupted, because each interruption brings us a valuable piece of information. To turn off these alerts is to risk feeling out of touch, or even socially isolated."
- Nicholas Carr, The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains

9. "The internet, as its proponents rightly remind us, makes for variety and convenience; it does not force anything upon you. Only it turns out it doesn’t feel like that at all. We don’t feel as if we had freely chosen our online practices. We feel instead that they are habits we have helplessly picked up or that history has enforced, that we are not distributing our attention as we intend or even like to"
- Nicholas Carr, The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains

10. "You can take a book to the beach without worrying about sand getting in its works. You can take it to bed without being nervous about it falling to the floor should you nod off. You can spill coffee on it. You can sit on it. You can put it down on a table, open to the page you’re reading, and when you pick it up a few days later it will still be exactly as you left it. You never have to be concerned about plugging a book into an outlet or having its battery die."
- Nicholas Carr, The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains

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