Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power Quotes.

1. "Our greatest leaders are neither dreamers nor dictators: They are, like Jefferson, those who articulate national aspirations yet master the mechanics of influence and know when to depart from dogma."
- Jon Meacham, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

2. "He dreamed big but understood that dreams become reality only when their champions are strong enough and wily enough to bend history to their purposes."
- Jon Meacham, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

3. "Broadly put, philosophers think: politicians maneuver. Jefferson's genius was that he was both and could do both, often simultaneously. Such is the art of power."
- Jon Meacham, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

4. "As much as Jefferson loved France residence abroad gave him greater appreciation for his own nation. He was a tireless advocate for things American while abroad, and a promoter of things European while at home. Moving between two worlds, translating the best of the old into the new and explaining the benefits of the new to the old, he created a role for himself as both intermediary and arbiter."
- Jon Meacham, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

5. "Sometimes paranoids have enemies, and conspiracies are only laughable when they fail to materialize."
- Jon Meacham, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

6. "Immaturity is the inability to use one’s understanding without guidance from another."
- Jon Meacham, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

7. "Jefferson was ambivalent about executive power – until he bore executive responsibility."
- Jon Meacham, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

8. "Politicians often talk too much and listen too little, which can be self-defeating, for in many instances the surer route to winning a friend is not to convince them that you are right but that you care what they think."
- Jon Meacham, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

9. "Leadership meant knowing how to distill complexity into a comprehensible message to reach the hearts as well as the minds of the larger world."
- Jon Meacham, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

10. "Madison described the state of play well in May 1798: The management of foreign relations appears to be the most susceptible of abuse of all the trusts committed to a Government, because they can be concealed or disclosed, or disclosed in such parts and at such times as will best suit particular views.…22 Perhaps it is a universal truth that the loss of liberty at home is to be charged to provisions against danger real or pretended from abroad. Extreme measures"
- Jon Meacham, Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power

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