Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values Quotes.

1. "Is it hard?' Not if you have the right attitudes. Its having the right attitudes thats hard."
- Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values

2. "When you live in the shadow of insanity, the appearance of another mind that thinks and talks as yours does is something close to a blessed event."
- Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values

3. "He felt that institutions such as schools, churches, governments and political organizations of every sort all tended to direct thought for ends other than truth, for the perpetuation of their own functions, and for the control of individuals in the service of these functions. He came to see his early failure as a lucky break, an accidental escape from a trap that had been set for him, and he was very trap-wary about institutional truths for the remainder of his time."
- Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values

4. "Caring about what you are doing is considered either unimportant or taken for granted."
- Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values

5. "It’s not the motorcycle maintenance, not the faucet. It’s all of technology they can’t take. And then all sorts of things started tumbling into place and I knew that was it. Sylvia’s irritation at a friend who thought computer programming was ‘creative.’ All their drawings and paintings and photographs without a technological thing in them. Of course she’s not going to get mad at that faucet, I thought. You always suppress momentary anger at something you deeply and permanently hate. Of course John signs off every time the subject of cycle repair comes up, even when it is obvious he is suffering for it. That’s technology. And sure, of course, obviously. It’s so simple when you see it. To get away from technology out into the country in the fresh air and sunshine is why they are on the motorcycle in the first place. For me to bring it back to them just at the point and place where they think they have finally escaped it just frosts both of them, tremendously. That’s why the conversation always breaks and freezes when the subject comes up. Other things fit in too. They talk once in a while in as few pained words as possible about ‘it’ or ‘it all’ as in the sentence, ‘There is just no escape from it.’ And if I asked, ‘From what?’ the answer might be ‘The whole thing,’ or ‘The whole organized bit,’ or even ‘The system.’ Sylvia once said defensively, ‘Well, you know how to cope with it,’ which puffed me up so much at the time I was embarrassed to ask what ‘it’ was and so remained somewhat puzzled. I thought it was something more mysterious than technology. But now I see that the ‘it’ was mainly, if not entirely, technology. But, that doesn’t sound right either. The ‘it’ is a kind of force that gives rise to technology, something undefined, but inhuman, mechanical, lifeless, a blind monster, a death force. Something hideous they are running from but know they can never escape. I’m putting it way too heavily here but in a less emphatic and less defined way this is what it is. Somewhere there are people who understand it and run it but those are technologists, and they speak an inhuman language when describing what they do. It’s all parts and relationships of unheard-of things that never make any sense no matter how often you hear about them. And their things, their monster keeps eating up land and polluting their air and lakes, and there is no way to strike back at it, and hardly any way to escape it."
- Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values

6. "A man conducting a gee-whiz science show with fifty thousand dollars’ worth of Frankenstein equipment is not doing anything scientific if he knows beforehand what the results of his efforts are going to be. A motorcycle mechanic, on the other hand, who honks the horn to see if the battery works is informally conducting a true scientific experiment. He is testing a hypothesis by putting the question to nature."
- Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values

7. "(1) statement of the problem, (2) hypotheses as to the cause of the problem, (3) experiments designed to test each hypothesis, (4) predicted results of the experiments, (5) observed results of the experiments and (6) conclusions from the results of the experiments."
- Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values

8. "The place to improve the world is first in one's own heart and head and hands, and then work outward from there."
- Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

9. "When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity. When many people suffer from a delusion it is called a Religion."
- Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

10. "The truth knocks on the door and you say, "Go away, I'm looking for the truth," and so it goes away. Puzzling."
- Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

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